3rd annual “Little Heart Hero Day” for Families Affected by Heart Defects is Nov. 19 in Saco

3rd annual “Little Heart Hero Day” for Families Affected by Heart Defects is Nov. 19 in SacoHeart defects are the leading birth defect in Maine children. The American Heart Association is hosting its 3rd annual “Little Heart Hero Day” – an afternoon of fun and networking for children with congenital heart defects and their families – on Sunday, November 19 from 1-3 pm at the OA Centers for Orthopaedics in Saco.

 

Heart defects are the leading birth defect in Maine children. The American Heart Association is hosting its 3rd annual “Little Heart Hero Day” – an afternoon of fun and networking for children with congenital heart defects and their families – on Sunday, November 19 from 1-3 pm at the OA Centers for Orthopaedics in Saco.

 

This free event will feature inspirational guest speakers, crafts, heart-healthy snacks, and great networking for parents. All Little Heart Heroes – survivors of congenital heart defects (CHDs) – will receive personalized red capes. Family members can also enjoy many crafts, make-your-own healthy snack bags, face painting, and an appearance by a balloon artist.  Attendees can participate in a fun workout with Performance Coach Harry Knox and Hands-Only CPR demonstrations.

 

In the U.S. about 40,000 babies are born with a CHD each year, which equates to one child every 15 minutes. Approximately 25% of children born with a CHD will need heart surgery or other interventions to survive. Today, because of advancements made through research, more infants born with congenital heart defects survive to adulthood. Despite the progress made in understanding and treating CHDs, more research is needed.

 

To RSVP for this free event, sponsored by Spectrum Healthcare Partners, please contact Julie Westerhouse at Julie.Westerhouse@heart.org or 207-289-2394.

 

 

In the U.S. about 40,000 babies are born with a CHD each year, which equates to one child every 15 minutes. Approximately 25% of children born with a CHD will need heart surgery or other interventions to survive. Today, because of advancements made through research, more infants born with congenital heart defects survive to adulthood. Despite the progress made in understanding and treating CHDs, more research is needed.

 

To RSVP for this free event, sponsored by Spectrum Healthcare Partners, please contact Julie Westerhouse at Julie.Westerhouse@heart.org or 207-289-2394.

 

 

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