National Wear Red Day® – Friday, February 7, 2020 – brings awareness across Connecticut to women’s leading health threat: cardiovascular disease

The American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women® movement urges women to take action to reduce their personal risk for cardiovascular disease

The American Heart Association, the world’s leading nonprofit organization focused on heart and brain health for all, together with its signature movement, Go Red for Women®, encourages you to ‘wear red and give’ on Friday, which is National Wear Red Day® to raise awareness that cardiovascular disease is a woman’s greatest health threat.National Wear Red Day® – Friday, February 7, 2020 – brings awareness across Connecticut to women’s leading health threat: cardiovascular disease

Cardiovascular disease kills one woman every 80 seconds and takes more lives than all forms of cancer combined1.

Heart disease and stroke also impact the lives of one in three women – or a third of all mothers, sisters and friends – and cardiac events are on the rise in young women2 in their 20s.

In issuing this year’s Wear Red and Give challenge, the chairperson of the American Heart Association’s Connecticut Board of Directors, Corliss Montessi of Cheshire, called on the public to play a role in an ever-expanding positive movement. “We are empowering women to take charge of their heart health.”

“I urge you to join the fight, and the 900,000 women who have committed to wear red on Friday and take steps to improve their lives and those of their moms, daughters, sisters and aunts across America,” said Montessi. “

While 80 percent of cardiovascular diseases can be prevented through modest changes to diet and lifestyle3, disparities in care for women’s heart and brain health continue to exist. In addition, heart disease and stroke symptoms can present differently in women compared to men. Women also make up less than half of all clinical trial participants globally, with women of color only accounting for three percent. As a result, more research is needed to close

gender disparity gaps when it comes to cardiovascular research, treatment and care.

The American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women movement, nationally sponsored by CVS Health and locally sponsored across the region by over 300 companies and organizations large and small, encourages everyone to show your support by wearing red and giving today and throughout the month of February to help save lives of women around the world.

Here’s how you can join Go Red for Women in support of women’s health:
• Wear red on National Wear Red Day, Friday, Feb. 7, 2020 to raise awareness about cardiovascular disease – the leading cause of death in women. The iconic Red Dress Pin and other apparel at is available at ShopHeart.org.
• Make a donation to support the lifesaving work of the American Heart Association at by texting BDL to 41444 or visiting WearRedDay.org.
• CVS Health is the national sponsor of the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women Movement and will be offering no-cost heart-health screenings at MinuteClinic® locations nationwide select Thursdays in February. (https://www.cvs.com/content/gored)National Wear Red Day® – Friday, February 7, 2020 – brings awareness across Connecticut to women’s leading health threat: cardiovascular disease
• Sign up to participate in the lifesaving clinical trial research through the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women movement and Verily’s Project Baseline: Research Goes Red initiative.
(https://www.goredforwomen.org/en/get-involved/research)
• Join the conversation by using #WearRedAndGive on social media.

“Since the first National Wear Red Day was declared in February of 2003 there have been impressive strides in the fight against heart disease and stroke in women,” said Todd Munn, Executive Director of American Heart Association in Connecticut.

“The focus and the research and education to develop healthy lifestyle changes are making a real impact. Nearly 90% of women nationally have made at least one healthy behavior change, and more than 50% have increased their amount of exercise,” continued Munn.

Cardiovascular diseases continue to be a woman’s greatest health threat. To treat, beat and prevent heart disease and stroke, women should understand family health history, know their five key personal health numbers – these help determine risk for heart disease and stroke: total cholesterol, HDL (good) cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar and body mass index – and make healthy behavior changes like moving more, eating smart and managing blood pressure. More Know Your Numbers info here:
https://www.goredforwomen.org/en/know-your-risk/know-your-numbers

Go Red Campaign Video (YouTube) https://youtu.be/hSnqvJ1IsoQ

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